Training in Advocacy

Wright's Law offers training programs, webinars, and books. I am currently taking their web-x training found HERE. When I was working on obtaining an IEP/504 Plan for my kids I used the following books. 

 1. From Emotions to Advocacy Second Edition

 2. Special Education Law Second Edition

 3. Special Education Legal Developments and Cases 2018

I highly recommend getting print copies to take notes and mark relevant pages. 

The Council of Parent Attorneys and Advocates (COPAA) offers year-long advocate training (SEAT). I hope to register for this year's training starting 8/2021. These classes fill up quickly. 

The Center for Parent Information and Resources lists training centers by state. 

"There are nearly 100 Parent Training and Information Centers (PTIs) and Community Parent Resource Centers (CPRCs) in the US and Territories.

These Centers perform a variety of direct services for children and youth with disabilities, families, professionals, and other organizations that support them.

Some of the activities include:

  • Working with families of infants, toddlers, children, and youth with disabilities, birth to 26

  • Helping parents participate effectively in their children’s education and development

  • Partnering with professionals and policy makers to improve outcomes for all children with disabilities"

Willam and Mary Law Institute offers a Summer Advocacy Conference. 

The National Association for Gifted Children offers a Leadership and Advocacy Conference in March. It is 3 full days so make sure you have all three days clear so you can attend. 

The Davidson Institute supports gifted learners whose IQ is in the 99.9%. This organization has assisted our family in learning about giftedness, what it means to be gifted and have a disability (twice-exceptional), and wrote letters to our school district in regards to our kids and offering educational resources. 

Without the support of the Davidson Institute and the other Davidson families, we would have struggled for years.